Hepatic ribosomal protein S6 (Rps6) insufficiency results in failed bile duct development and loss of hepatocyte viability; a ribosomopathy-like phenotype that is partially p53-dependent

Sarah A. Comerford, Elizabeth A. Hinnant, Yidong Chen, Robert E Hammer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Defective ribosome biogenesis (RiBi) underlies a group of clinically diverse human diseases collectively known as the ribosomopathies, core manifestations of which include cytopenias and developmental abnormalities that are believed to stem primarily from an inability to synthesize adequate numbers of ribosomes and concomitant activation of p53. The importance of a correctly functioning RiBi machinery for maintaining tissue homeostasis is illustrated by the observation that, despite having a paucity of certain cell types in early life, ribosomopathy patients have an increased risk for developing cancer later in life. This suggests that hypoproliferative states trigger adaptive responses that can, over time, become maladaptive and inadvertently drive unchecked hyperproliferation and predispose to cancer. Here we describe an experimentally induced ribosomopathy in the mouse and show that a normal level of hepatic ribosomal protein S6 (Rps6) is required for proper bile duct development and preservation of hepatocyte viability and that its insufficiency later promotes overgrowth and predisposes to liver cancer which is accelerated in the absence of the tumor-suppressor PTEN. We also show that the overexpression of c-Myc in the liver ameliorates, while expression of a mutant hyperstable form of p53 partially recapitulates specific aspects of the hepatopathies induced by Rps6 deletion. Surprisingly, co-deletion of p53 in the Rps6-deficient background fails to restore biliary development or significantly improve hepatic function. This study not only reveals a previously unappreciated dependence of the developing liver on adequate levels of Rps6 and exquisitely controlled p53 signaling, but suggests that the increased cancer risk in ribosomopathy patients may, in part, stem from an inability to preserve normal tissue homeostasis in the face of chronic injury and regeneration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1010595
JournalPLoS genetics
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 19 2023

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Hepatic ribosomal protein S6 (Rps6) insufficiency results in failed bile duct development and loss of hepatocyte viability; a ribosomopathy-like phenotype that is partially p53-dependent'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this